Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells: The Best of Early Vanity Fair

Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells: The Best of Early Vanity Fair

edited by Graydon Carter with David Friend Paperback, 420 pages; 2015 (2014)
#UL0222 $18.00 Members' Price: $15.30

From 1913 to 1936, Vanity Fair magazine, under the helm of legendary editor Frank Crowninshield, served as (arguably) the arbiter of culture and taste for America, publishing articles, reviews, essays, fiction, and poems by such names as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, T. S. Eliot, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Thomas Mann, and more. Beginning with a hilariously satiric piece by P. G. Wodehouse about the phenomenon of daily physical exercise (and its negative impact upon the soul) and ending with Allene Talmey's lively profile of two former gangsters turned high-society nightclub owners, the entertaining and intellectually provocative pieces in Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells are presented chronologically. Reading through Dorothy Parker's "Why I Haven't Married" (1916), D. H. Lawrence's "Do Women Change?" (1929), and John Maynard Keynes's "Banks and Collapse of Money Values" (1932), it's remarkable how very much they evoke and illuminate fascinating moments in our country's history, while simultaneously remaining immediately relatable and relevant. (AG)

(UL0222) Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells: The Best of Early Vanity Fair

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